Implementing algorithms in the form of scripts has been an early step in training humans to be more like machines

From Cooperating with Algorithms in the Workplace:

Thus, concerning algorithms at work, people are either replaced by them, required to help them, or have become them. Workplace algorithms have been evolving for some time in the form of scripts and processes that employers have put in place for efficiency, “quality control,” brand consistency, product consistency, experience consistency and most particularly, cost savings. As a result phone calls to services such as hotels, shops and restaurants, may now have a script read out loud or memorized by the employee to the customer to ensure consistent experiences and task compliance.

Consistency of experience is increasingly a goal within organizations, and implementing algorithms in the form of scripts and processes has been an early step in training humans to be more like machines. Unfortunately, these algorithms can result in an inability to cooperate in contexts not addressed by the algorithm. These scripts and corresponding processes purposely greatly restrict human agency by failing to define clear boundaries for the domain of the algorithm and recognizing the need for adaptation outside these boundaries.

Thus, often if a worker is asked a specialized or specific query, they lack the ability to respond to it and will either turn away the customer, or accelerate the query up (and down) a supervisory management chain, with each link bound by its own scripts, processes and rules, which may result in a non-answer or non-resolution for the customer.

Not only the paper is mighty interesting, but the whole body of research it belongs too is worth serious investigation.