Sarcos

Robotic exoskeletons may revolutionize the heavy industry

From Using this robot gives you monstrously powerful mech arms – The Verge

The Guardian GT looks immense, but its real selling points is its dexterity. Two sensitive controllers are used to guide the huge robot arms, which follow the operators’ motions precisely. To get a closer look at the action, video feed from a camera mounted on top of the Guardian GT is sent to a headset worn by the operator. And the controllers also include force feedback, so the controller gets an idea of how much weight the robot is moving. Each arm can pick up 500 lbs independently.

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The Guardian GT’s control system allows it to take on delicate tasks, like pushing buttons and flipping switches. The video feed also means it can be used remotely. Combined, these attributes make the robot perfectly suited for dangerous jobs like cleaning out nuclear power plants. An onboard power source also means it can be operated without a tether, roaming independently for hours a time.

Sarcos is building a truly impressive series of robotic exoskeleton suits, not just the GT. You should also look at the Guardian XO on their website where there are better videos of all products than the one embedded in the above article.

Sarcos says that their technology is the future of heavy industry in a wide range of scenarios:

  • nuclear reactor inspection and maintenance
  • petroleum
  • construction
  • heavy equipment manufacturing
  • palletizing and de-palletizing
  • loading and unloading supplies
  • shipboard and in-field logistics
  • erecting temporary shelters
  • equipment repairs
  • medical evacuation
  • moving rocks and debris in humanitarian missions

but I think this is just the beginning. Thanks to technological progress, their exoskeletons could become thinner and thinner, lighter and lighter, and be used in other fields too (including war combat).

They are even attempting to establish a robot-as-a-service model.