Stanford

Stanford Researchers Create Organic Electronic Components That Dissolve Into The Body

From Scientists unveil ultra-thin electronics that can dissolve into the body

the team’s inventions include a biodegradable semi-conductive polymer, disintegrable and flexible electronic circuits, and a biodegradable substrate material for mounting these electrical components onto.

Totally flexible and biocompatible, the ultra-thin film substrate allows the components to be mounted onto both rough and smooth surfaces.

All together, the components can be used to create biocompatible, ultra-thin, lightweight and low-cost electronics for applications as diverse as wearable electronics to large-scale environmental surveys.

Maybe this is one of the many approaches we’ll use for biohacking or as wearable technology in the future.

Would you start saving money for college tuition, or for printing the genome of your offspring?

From Stanford’s Final Exams Pose Question About the Ethics of Genetic Engineering | Futurism

When bioengineering students sit down to take their final exams for Stanford University, they are faced with a moral dilemma, as well as a series of grueling technical questions that are designed to sort the intellectual wheat from the less competent chaff: “If you and your future partner are planning to have kids, would you start saving money for college tuition, or for printing the genome of your offspring?”

The question is a follow up to “At what point will the cost of printing DNA to create a human equal the cost of teaching a student in Stanford?”

I’d love to see the breakdown by gender, ethnicity, etc. and how the answers evolve year over year.